The Month In Cybersecurity: The Best Cybersecurity Articles of July 2018

POSTED BY   Michele Baker
2nd August 2018
The Month In Cybersecurity_ The Best Cybersecurity Articles of July 2018

As the month of July comes to a close, and August shines bright on the horizon, it’s time to reflect on the latest developments from the last 31 days. We’ve selected ten of the best Cybersecurity articles of July 2018, to help you get up to speed with what’s been going on in the world of Cybersecurity over the last month.

 

How A Bunch Of Lava Lamps Protect Us From Hackers (Wired)

By Ellen Airhart

How A Bunch Of Lava Lamps Protect Us From Hackers (Wired)

Every time you log in to any website, you’re assigned a unique ID number. It should be random, because if hackers can predict the number, they’ll impersonate you. Human-coded patterns can’t generate true randomness—but nobody can predict the goopy mesmeric swirlings of oil, water, and wax. Cloudflare films the lamps 24/7 and uses the ever-changing arrangement of pixels to help create a superpowered cryptographic key. Groovy, eh?

 

Russian Hackers Reach U.S. Utility Control Rooms, Homeland Security Officials Say (WSJ)

By Rebecca Smith

Russian Hackers Reach U.S. Utility Control Rooms, Homeland Security Officials Say (WSJ)

If you can get behind the WSJ paywall, then great. Otherwise, be assured that this same news is reported elsewhere too, though the WSJ was the outlet that broke the story. Let’s go for a similar piece from The Conversation instead. Rather than covering that news directly, it gives a thoughtful insight into the context within which the Russian hack operates, and other attacks both by foreign parties and the US itself.

 

Inmates hack prison tablets, transfer nearly $225k into own accounts (AJC)

By Cox Media Group National Content Desk

Inmates hack prison tablets, transfer nearly $225k into own accounts (AJC)

Interesting to learn that inmates in the US are given tablets. That’s not the impression I got from Orange Is The New Black. And judging by my knowledge of prisons (again, mostly based on Orange Is The New Black), if you give prisoners stuff like that, something is likely to go wrong. So, in my view at least, it’s no big surprise that inmates used them to “intentionally exploit a vulnerability within JPay to improperly increase their JPay account balances.” Throw them in the SHU!

 

Trump admin has no central strategy for election security, and no one’s in charge (NBC)

By Ken Dilanian

Trump admin has no central strategy for election security, and no one's in charge (NBC)

Funnily enough, Trump isn’t bothered about election security. I wonder why that is…

 

From today, Google Chrome starts marking all non-HTTPS sites ‘Not Secure’ (The Hacker News)

By Mohit Kumar

From today, Google Chrome starts marking all non-HTTPS sites 'Not Secure' (The Hacker News)

You’ve had a good while now to get your SSL certification sorted out, and now the deadline has passed. If your site is still not HTTPS then your traffic is going to drop considerably – people aren’t keen to visit insecure websites. Particularly if your site has login pages or payment forms, you’re going to need to secure that, asap. This piece explains more about why you need to get it sorted and how, just in case you’ve had your head in the sand for the last couple of years.

 

Hacker Sold Stolen U.S. Military Drone Documents On Dark Web For Just $200 (The Hacker News)

By Swati Khandelwal

Hacker Sold Stolen U.S. Military Drone Documents On Dark Web For Just $200 (The Hacker News)

With only moderate skills, a hacker was able to infiltrate the computer of a captain at 432d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Reaper AMU OIC, stationed at the Creech AFB in Nevada. He was then able to steal a bunch of top secret documents, representing a potential threat to national security. He then whacked those docs onto the Dark Web, selling them for a rock-bottom price. A bit scary, this one.

 

Girl Scouts unveils 30 new STEM-related badges, including space exploration and cybersecurity (The Verge)

By Makena Kelly

Girl Scouts unveils 30 new STEM-related badges, including space exploration and cybersecurity (The Verge)

Jolly good news! It’s great to hear that the Girl Scouts of America are getting up to date. Not so sure that the UK equivalent, Girlguiding UK, would be quite so future-thinking. It is brilliant, however, to see a tangible step towards encouraging girls into STEM in a time when there are shockingly few women entering STEM careers.

 

Reminder—Third Party Gmail Apps Can Read Your Emails, “Allow” Carefully! (The Hacker News)

By Mohit Kumar

Reminder—Third Party Gmail Apps Can Read Your Emails, "Allow" Carefully! (The Hacker News)

You thought Facebook was bad? Well, duh! Google is even worse. It has vastly more personal data on you than any social network, and all those third-party apps that you log into with your Google account can – shockingly – actually go in and take a good look at your emails. You’re better off signing in with Facebook, and that’s saying something!

 

The Worst Cybersecurity Breaches of 2018 So Far (Wired)

By Lily Hay Newman

The Worst Cybersecurity Breaches of 2018 So Far (Wired)

Though there have been fewer breaches this year than in 2017, that’s not exactly comforting news. As Wired notes, corporate security is failing to keep pace with the fast-moving developments required to stay ahead of hacks. It’s not just corporate security, either. Infrastructure security, as we saw above in the news about the US utility hacks, is way behind. We’re not talking just individual hackers, like the guy who did the military hack we talked about above, it’s also state-backed hackers, like Russia. Time to pull our security socks up, all!

 

Between You, Me, and Google: Problems With Gmail’s “Confidential Mode” (EFF)

By Gennie Gebhart and Corey Doctorow

Between You, Me, and Google: Problems With Gmail's “Confidential Mode” (EFF)

Google’s “Confidential Mode” sounds pretty cool, especially for anyone sending secret information that they don’t want to be passed on. It allows you to restrict how the emails you send can be viewed and shared. An email sent in Confidential Mode cannot be printed or forwarded. You can even use a ‘self-destruct’ feature which deletes the message in the recipient’s inbox after a pre-set period, and requires a text message code to open in the first place. But the tool may be somewhat misleading – how confidential is Confidential Mode, really?

 

These articles represent our team’s recommendations for the best Cybersecurity articles in July 2018, but you may have other suggestions. Drop us a link in the comments, so others can enjoy the articles you have also found interesting this month.

 

TechTech Book Club

BIG READER?

Join the TDMB TechTech Book Club. We meet once a month in a cosy London pub to discuss a chosen technology book as picked by the community.

Sign up to find out more.

 

0
The Month In Cybersecurity: The Best Cybersecurity Articles of July 2018

Michele Baker

Michele Baker is the Senior Content Strategist at TDMB. She began her journey into tech marketing via a Masters in Creative Writing, evolving from a prize-winning poet and short story writer to a futuristic content guru. Michele now writes endlessly about all aspects of technology, hosts the TDMB Presents… tech podcast, and speaks at numerous tech and marketing events.


Get in Touch With Michele Baker

01306 632 854
michele@thedigitalmarketingbureau.com

You may also like

Cybersecurity – Your Technology Is Listening
23rd January 2018
Cyber Security
Mirai: The True Threat of DDoS Attacks
15th December 2017
Cyber Security
Cybersecurity is just like the fight against knife crime
7th December 2017
Cyber Security

Post a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *